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Saraba Magazine: Transitions

saraba magazine: transitions

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In our first print issue, “Transitions,” the stories, essays, poems, and photographs consider movement, journeys, departures, and exchange. The cover is designed by Ojima Abalaka, the brilliant illustrator whose work has been featured in the New York Times. There are poems by Gbenga Adesina; short stories by Suzanne Ushie, Irenosen Okojie, Abiola Oni, Eboka Chukwudi Peter, T J Benson, Amarachi Ekekwe, Hajara Hussaini Ashara, and Ebele Mogo; essays by Temitayo Olofinlua, Kola Tubosun, Uche Okonkwoand Yinka Elujoba; portfolios of photographs by Ladan Osman and Ayeni Olajide. And an interview of Ayobami Adebayo by Emmanuel Iduma....

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Alimony  by Arthur Anyaduba

alimony by arthur anyaduba

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On the occasion of our 7th anniversary, we present our eighteenth issue and a supplementary poetry chapbook. In the crime issue, Arthur Anyaduba on an African in Winnipeg who takes the law into his hands...

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Take Off, Victorious by Melissa Tandiwe Myambo

take off, victorious by melissa tandiwe myambo

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Melissa Tandiwe Myambo’s remarkable new story, “Take-off, Victorious,” provides further proof of her ability to transmute the base metal of any theme she touches into literary gold. Set in the pressure-cooker world of competitive sports, the story not only focuses with unflinching intensity on a high-flyer’s descent into existential crisis, it also investigates the chaos introduced by that protagonist’s troubles into the lives of a large cast of powerfully drawn characters. Even readers acquainted with Ms Myambo’s other exquisite works like “Special Meal” and the Caine Prize-shortlisted “La Salle de Départ” will be stunned by the spellbinding artistry of her new piece, as well as by its compelling insights. Melissa Tandiwe Myambo recoils from the limelight; however, if she continues privileging us with stories such as “Take-off, Victorious,” the limelight will have no choice but to permanently brighten her door with its blinding presence. —Rotimi Babatunde, Winner, Caine Prize for African Writing, 2012...

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